Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Resistance movements

After reading about the exposure of slavery and cohabitation in the cabins, discuss some of the different forms of resistance they exemplify.  Connect specific examples from the articles to at least two of the themes we have already discussed.

9 comments:

  1. After reading the two articles about exposure of slavery one form of resistance that was exemplified was in the first reading, "A Former Slave Exposes Slavery" the did not resist the temptation in asking his master how to read. This connects with the theme of "important to with hold information from slaves." The husband of the mistress, Master Hugh was so furious and astounded that he believed he had to tell her the true philosophy of the slave system. "If you teach him how to read, he'll want to know how to write, and this accomplished, he'll be running away with himself." Another theme that was exemplified through the resistance of slavery was in the second reading, "Cohabitation in the Cabinets," when Eliza did not want to be separated from her children, and pleaded to stay with them even after he screamed at her to stop, and got out his whip.

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  2. After reading the two articles i feel that resistance movements were well and present and the masters knew about it. In the first passage when the slave asks their masters wife to read and she agrees, when the master finds out he is appalled because he knows that if he can actually read he may be able to teach the other slaves and then start a resistance against them. I also find it surprising that she agreed in the first place because she must also feel that the slave is the inferior slave and wouldn't want them to be able to be at their standards.

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  3. After reading “Cohabitation in the Cabins,” the reader understands that the masters were very concerned with their own pride. Many of their actions were chosen based on how they wanted other slave owners to view them. It is understood when reading, that the woman, Caroline, was raped every night in order to have children who could benefit the master’s working needs. Though it is not said outright, it is inferred that Caroline tried to fight back. I related Caroline’s story to that of Randell’s from “This Cargo of Human Flesh,” because they both were quiet in the way they resisted but they both made large impacts in the lives around them. After Reading, “ A Former Slave Exposes slavery,” the form of resistance I thought that the slave used was his thoughts. Though he did not act out, he believed and understood that his hard work, and the hard work of many of his fellow slaves, benefited another race.

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  4. I am finding it hard to relate the "exposure" of slavery to the text read. However, in the beginning you can see how they resisted by attempting how to learn to read from the Bible until the master sopped it, saying a slave should know no more than the will of his master. Another form of resistance is just thought. This is similar to the story of Douglass who was mentally abused and broken yet was able to understand what was going on, the injustice in it, and how to continue. Sexuality is also becoming a very prevalent theme in the slave environment; the slave getting raped as a "breeder", the masters checking the slaves more intimately, and the intimacy of the master/slave relationship,

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  5. I think "the exposure of slavery" shows a more clear resistance and the resistance in the "cohabitation in the cabins" is not as strong as the first one. Both of them show a form of slavery resistance that is not aboveboard and sharp. The resistance in "the exposure of slavery" is more like what we talked about yesterday "Mind-control of slavery/importance of withholding information from slaves“ because when he (the slave) was trying to learn reading, he was blocked because the masters were afraid that he could run away and teach other slaves how to read. In the "cohabitation in the cabins" the slave Eliza was staying with her kids to show that she is resisting and pretend she didn't know anything even she was going to be whipped after that. This theme can kind of link to "Master/Mistress-slave relationship/Sexuality of slavery".

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  6. After reading the two selections, I believe that a very big step in resisting slavery was taken when he asked the masters wife how to read. Educating ones self was many slaves first steps to breaking away from their owners. I can relate this to the Mind Control/ withholding information aspect of the last article we read. Number one example is "If you teach him how to read, he'll want to know how to write, and this accomplished, he'll be running away with himself." If that's not withholding information, I don't what is.

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  7. After I read “Cohabitation in the Cabins,” I felt that there was more of a reason that the master’s treated their slaves in a horrible way. I felt the writer was trying to get the reader to understand that reputation was a key component for slave masters. The way in which they were viewed by other slave master’s was important because if they were viewed as nice to their slaves they could of been taking advantage of by other strong slave masters. I related Caroline’s story to Randell’s from “This Cargo of Human Flesh,” because they both took the hardest impact out of all the slaves from their masters. This in a way made the lives of the other slaves a lot easier because they were the one’s to be raped and abused. Also neither of these slaves felt any embarrassment to ask the slave master if they could teach them how to read. These slaves brought used their brave personality’s in a great way.

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  8. After reading the two different articles, resistance was not as much. In the first article, the slave is with his master's wife when she is reading the bible to him. The master becomes aggravated and says that "If you give a nigger an inch, he will take an ell. Learning will spoil the best nigger in the world. If he learns to read the bible, it will forever unfit him to be a slave. He should know nothing but the will of the master, and learn to obey it. As to himself learning will do him no good, but a great deal of harm making him disconsolate and unhappy. If you teach him how to read, he'll want to know how to write and this is accomplished he'll be running away with himself." This shows that the masters saw the slaves as property and they did not want to them to be able to run away and even though the slave owners were Christian, they were still hypocritical because the bible does not teach that.

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  9. The first passage says that Douglass was flogged without effect. His master found no way of discipling him, so he sent him to a slave breaker. Douglass' whole life was a resistance to slavery., from his learning to read and write to his giving an abolitionist speech. For all the slaves who had suffered and were still suffering, who could not speak for themselves, he spoke out for them. He told stories of a people demoralized and debased in a "free" country. He told of masters, professed Christians, who read Bible by day and committed fornication by night.

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